MQ! 2019

The MQ! Innovation Summit 2019 took place on the 4th & 5th of December in Beijing, China.

Take a look at the MQ! 2017 and MQ! 2018 as well.

9 Speakers

Dr. Kai-Fu Lee

Dr. Kai-Fu Lee

Gaby-Luise Wüst

Gaby-Luise Wüst

Peggy Liu

Peggy Liu

Caritta Seppä

Caritta Seppä

Dr. Patrick Kramer

Dr. Patrick Kramer

Derek Haoyang Li

Derek Haoyang Li

Dr. Rüdiger Recknagel

Dr. Rüdiger Recknagel

Boris Meiners

Boris Meiners

Daizong Liu

Daizong Liu

Richard Robinson

Richard Robinson

13 Workshops

How might we change car development with big data technologies?

Digital systems control large parts of life today. Computers serve as workstations, multimedia systems for entertainment, and smartphones as a multifunctional tool. But none of this would be possible without large amounts of data. Complex IT solutions are needed to process this data. They are also increasingly important for the automotive industry. Work steps can be simplified and precisely controlled. But there are many more possibilities in technology that nobody can think of today. The aim of this workshop was to better grasp this complex topic.

How might we change our daily life due to autonomous vehicles and driving?

Those who do not have to drive themselves have more time for other things, both on longer journeys and on shorter commuting distances. With autonomous vehicles, work can be done on the way to the office. The after-work period, on the other hand, already starts on the journey home. Family outings are also more relaxed because parents can interact with their children much better on the road. But these are just a few examples of what is possible with autonomous vehicles. The participants in this workspace had the task of developing many more use cases.

How might we unleash the potential of station based micro mobility?

Micromobility is one of the great issues of our time. The idea behind it is as simple as it is ingenious: First, you get close to your destination by car. For the last few meters, however, a smaller electric vehicle is available. This ensures that the search for a parking space is less nerve-racking and that certain areas in cities have less traffic. In a station-based system, users have a parking facility and a large selection of micromobility vehicles on site. This workspace dealt with how such a solution could look and what the Chinese market demands of it.

How might we create digital fun in a car?

Vehicles are not only a form of transport, but also a part of a lifestyle. They should therefore offer users not only comfort, but also a lot of fun. Whether alone or on trips with friends, having a good time is always a valuable commodity. Due to the limited space in a car, this is not easy to accomplish — which is why digital systems are the focus of attention. However, they should not distract the driver, at least during the journey. Striking the right balance was the goal of this workspace. In addition, it was important to find out how people in China define fun in the first place.

How might we merge biotech and AI to upgrade the user experience in mobility?

Emotions cannot simply be turned off in humans. That’s why they also occur again and again in traffic. Anger, stress, and annoyance can have a negative influence on driving behavior. This is a risk for others on the road. But it is precisely such emotions that can be measured. If such technology is built into the vehicle, it could record the mood and initiate countermeasures. These include relaxation techniques using light and sound. During the workspace, the participants were given an insight into the technology developed together with Nuralogix, and were able to test for themselves whether the countermeasures are effective.

How might we design the interior based on users' needs?

Good design is not only visually attractive, but also functional. This is of great importance in a vehicle, where the design should create an atmosphere of well-being. At the same time, the driver and passengers must be guaranteed easy operation of all important systems. Design is therefore a central component of the user experience. But not every user has the same requirements. In this workspace, it was necessary to find out such requirements and analyze them more precisely.

How might we build in-car applications with and for everybody?

The smartphone has been around for more than a decade. It is no longer just a helper in everyday life, but a central component of it. It combines computer, camera, and telephone in one device. It also opens up completely new possibilities in modern vehicles. For example, navigation can be carried out via the device if desired. The focus lies of course on the apps. But they can also be used directly in the vehicle — without a smartphone. For users to accept apps, however, they must be tailored exactly to their needs.

How might we define the value of premium mobility?

Not only vehicle powertrains are changing, but also the way they are used. Mobility is becoming more a question of service rather than of ownership. Vehicles can be used for short periods of time — just as needed. This makes premium mobility harder to define, because luxury takes on a completely new meaning with such short cycles. How it can be defined was worked out by the participants of this workspace, all with regional differences and goals taken into consideration.

How might we create smart applications in a smart city?

Digitalization does not stop even at the automotive sector. Vehicles are able to communicate with each other and with traffic systems, making mobility smarter than ever. For cities, this opens up completely new possibilities with intelligent traffic control becoming increasingly simple. But to do so, it is important to know the requirements. Only in this way can vehicles and traffic be coordinated. The task in this workspace was to find out about these requirements and develop concepts for them.

How might we design a service to balance the requirements of users, cities and technology players?

Mobility itself is dynamic, and so should the associated systems. After all, constant change demands more flexible adaptations to the changing needs of users. This applies not only to the vehicles, but also to the infrastructures in which they move. In other words, faster adjustments to the circumstances are needed. In order to achieve this, commitment is needed from all sides.

How might we fulfil well-being in mobility?

Mobility is in a constant state of change — now perhaps more than ever before. Numerous digital systems have already made it into the car, and in the future they could even enable vehicles to drive completely autonomously. For users, therefore, different things are at the forefront than it was the case just a few years ago. To make them feel comfortable in a vehicle, new ideas and approaches are needed.

How might we decode the Chinese customers’ needs for electric mobility?

With the leap to electric mobility, vehicles are changing significantly. The same applies to the demands placed on them. Certain features may be less important, others much more than before. Differences between individual markets should also be taken into account in order to offer users a vehicle with functions tailored to their needs. With China in mind, this workspace was all about that.

How might we empower the momentum for sustainable mobility?

Sustainability is one of the most important topics of the present and the future. Using resources more efficiently and, ideally reusing them, helps to keep the earth clean. Of course, this is not only a matter for individuals, but also for companies. They can make a difference on a completely different scale and set a good example. This workspace was about identifying China’s demands on sustainable enterprises and developing concrete approaches.

2 Panel Discussions

Autonomous Mobility

Autonomous vehicles represent the biggest change to transportation since the car replaced the horse-drawn cart. AVs will not only reshape our cities but also our lives resulting in a massive change to our urban environments and beyond.
Join our industry experts for a wide-ranging discussion on the future of autonomous driving from multiple perspectives including congestion and pollution reduction and the interconnection with smart cities; technological and regulatory breakthroughs and limitations; potential security and ethical implications; and much more.

  • Alexander Pesch (Senior Director Development Automated Driving / ICV)
  • Tallis Liu (Director of Creative Communications Strategy at Neolix)
  • Hua Zhong (WeRide SVP of Engineering)
  • Yufeng Zhang (General Manager, Automotive Business Unit, Horizon Robotics)
  • Richard Robinson (Founding Partner at Whip Wham and Peking University Professor)

Audi Innovation Lab

More than 7,000 applications have already been received since the “Audi Innovation Lab” platform was established in 2013. Every year, particularly promising innovators are given the opportunity to present their ideas to Audi China and partners. This year, for the first time, this will happen as a part of the MQ! Innovation Summit. This year’s topic: Apps and services for the Audi MMI. Whoever is convincing may soon be working hand-in-hand with Audi — and sees their idea come to life in future vehicles.

  • Xiaoguang Sun (Venture Partner of Bosch Venture Capital)
  • Qihui Fan (Executive Director of Legend Capital)
  • You Zuo (Head of Digital Business Car, Data, Support, Audi China)
  • Pingchao Fang (Partner of Cyzone Angel Fund, Managing Director of investment and financing)